diglloyd Mac Performance Guide

Up to 8TB of Thunderbolt Storage!

SSDStorageMemory

TESTED: Kingston HyperX 128GB Data Traveler USB3 Thumb Drive

Compact storage for critical files can go into a pocket or safe deposit box or briefcase and so on—which is why MPG acquired the Kingston HyperX 128GB Data Traveler.

Kingston HyperX 128GB Data Traveler USB3 Thumb Drive

Kingston HyperX 128GB Data Traveler USB3 Thumb Drive
1728 | 2592 | 3456
disktester run-sequential-suite — speed vs transfer size Kingston HyperX 128GB
disktester run-sequential-suite — speed vs transfer size
Kingston HyperX 128GB

Year End Computer Purchases: Consult

Charles (4 Mac Pro systems) writes:

I did a back of the envelope calculation, it looks like you saved me about $15,000 total for the four systems.

I don't know how to put a value FastRawViewer but it looks like a game changer for me. It is faster than I can use even on my notebook. Wow!!!

MPG: I like to save my consulting clients money.

Adele writes:

I have a 2009 Mac Pro (4 drives plus a four drive enclosure for backup plus other off-site backup) and a 2010 MacBook Pro, both of which likely need to be replaced.

My accountant has suggested that I do this before year end.

MPG: The tax year is indeed about to close. My consulting hours are flexible, and I work with clients all over the world. While I don’t Skype myself, clients can skype to me from virtually anywhere.

Apple Core Rot

Forbes weighs in a nearly year after I first wrote Apple Core Rot, though Mr. Kosner seems to have missed MPG entirely. MPG doesn’t need a chorus to recognize trends early.

Declining iOS and OS X Quality Imperil Apple's Future Growth And Retention

The iPhone 6 has set sales records since its first week of release and led to Apple’s most profitable quarter ever. There have been some bumps in the road, but the market—and Apple’s customers—continue to have that loving feeling. What could possibly go wrong?

In a word, software. A growing chorus of developers and Apple-watchers is raising the alarm that the buggy releases of iOS 8 and Yosemite are part of a systemic decline in the quality of Apple’s software. The now-yearly release schedule for both iOS and OS X combined with the increasing complexity of the overall Apple ecosystem have put a strain on its engineers, these voices say.

MPG: A strain on engineers without a doubt.

But how about a strain and constant headache for users who actually have work to do, and developers? The schedule-driven worm-eaten OS X upgrades are getting old for their newness. A barrage of updates for this and that baffles an older friend of mine (and feels like a hassle to me). This ain’t no toaster; it’s a demanding taskmaster that delivers burned spots on the toast.

Today, OS X is a forest after rain—mushrooms sprouting, singly and in clumps (inedible ones). The genius that carried Apple has departed. In its place is the conductor of a million-ton train by a leader whose abilities are of another nature entirely. But friction will prevail, especially self-inflicted friction, if not corrected. Praise lavished on Apple designers now goes beyond accolades to acolytes. Truly elegant form is manifest in bringing flawless function to fruition, but are we now at the stage of “outstanding form, good enough function” so as to drive the profit train?

Apple Core Rot is accelerating. I deal with it every single day many times over. Stuff that worked for years breaks, while new visual crapware is piled on endlessly. Apple Mail deletes my VIP list every day, file open dialogs are sluggish in most programs, to 4-8 second delays in DreamWeaver and with display glitches. APIs are removed breaking apps some users depend upon. In 10.10.1, Apple broke display scaling APIs in 10.10.1 leading to all sorts of issues with Photoshop and dual and 4K displays, so much so that I cannot use a large 4K display as the main screen and still with problems as a 2nd.

The OS X file system, a critical layer of OS X still has a nasty bug I reported to Apple a year ago. Individual sites regularly hangs on my Mac Pro even while working fine on the same connection at the same time on my MacBook Pro. GPU support broken for months with the 2013 Mac Pro last year, the usability kitchen sink abomination that is iTunes, the pathetic Apple Calendar, the annoying 20-prompts-in-a-row demands to login to iCloud—it’s about crappy little stuff too. Crapware sprinkled in little bits all over the place. I’ve just given up documenting and reporting the are too-many issues—I have real work to do.

The level of sophistication required today to use OS X and even iOS has crept steadily higher; this is self evident whenever I work with an older friend; it has almost become unusable for some tasks—the assumed skill level is too high a bar. The young generation designing more and more fails to understand that less is more. Perhaps it’s a brain disconnect, quite literally, with brains trained by the tens of thousands of hours staring at electronic gadgets.

Don’t get me started on the dumbing-down of Apple hardware; a Mac Pro that is not pro, dual core limits on formerly 4-core machines (MacMini), all in one models that preclude significant upgradeability, a fixed 16GB memory limit on laptops, 32GB on iMac, 64GB on “pro”. The bar keeps coming down for capabilities.

As for iOS, gratuitous visual changes are forced upon users along with changes that impair readability for those of us with older eyes. Its core function of being a phone is compromised, and capabilities I’ll never use are forced into key parts of the UI. This is not elegance or usability; it is a failure to innovate, and it started several years ago.

Windows? Heck no, not yet, lesser of evils principle applies there.

Stan B writes:

Couldn’t agree with you more. I haven’t upgraded to Yosemite yet because of obvious, widespread user problems in forums.

iTunes and IOS are exercises in frustration for what used to be simple and intuitive. It’s sad to see the proliferation of crapware and the lower bar for quality.

MPG: a dissonant mass murmuration is developing, faint though it is relative to the massive sales engine that is Apple today.

TESTED: Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS Hard Drive — Fastest Yet!

The Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS hard drive is a superb performer—the fastest ever tested by MPG. About $319.

Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS Hard Drive

This drive is incorporated into an OWC Thunderbay 4 solution (at about $2099 for 24TB solution) and also the RAID-5 24/18TB edition (at about $2279).

1728 | 2592 | 3456
Sequential read/write performance of Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS Hard Drive MB/sec for 1000 files across the 6TB capacity
Sequential read/write performance of Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS Hard Drive
MB/sec for 1000 files across the 6TB capacity
disktester fill-volume
1728 | 2592 | 3456
Sequential read/write performance of Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS Hard Drive MB/sec for 1000 files across the 6TB capacity
Speed vs transfer size of Hitachi HGST Deskstar 6TB NAS Hard Drive
disktester run-sequential-suite

Troubling Precedent: Apple Pushes Security Update Without User Permission (NTP Security Flaw)

A disturbing precedent was set today in which Apple auto-installed (without notice or permission) OS X NTP Security Update.

Yes, I wanted the update and kudos to Apple for patching this bug quickly, but my computer is my property, and never mind whatever legal excrement Apple mixes into the OS X license, I do not grant Apple the right to invade my computer, no matter what the goal. The ends do not justify the means.

Apple pushes update without permission
Apple pushes update without permission

The update is not even listed in the Updates section of the App Store app on my Mac. Which in itself was a source of concern. How would one know it is legitimate unless by reading the news?

Update: see App Store preferences at end.

Bars always get pushed lower, not higher; lines once crossed are more easily crossed the next time. There is absolutely no reason that Apple could not respect users enough to post a warning, asking for permission to install the fix. But this is coming from the same company that forced unwanted U2 albums into users accounts. And so, MPG increasingly distrusts the judgment and ethics now at the helm of Apple.

Consider also that any update mechanism capable of pushing updates without user permission is in itself a massively juicy prize that any hacker worth his/her salt would love to snag. Moreover, all software code has bugs. These reasons alone are enough to warrant the removal of the capability entirely.

MPG calls upon Apple to defeat the ability in OS X to make any auto-push update of any kind—remove the code so as to remove the risk.

Finally, consider a secret court order that instructs Apple to push an “update” that has, say, a bit more than one wishes for? Pick your country, USA or otherwise. All such prospects are chilling.

App Store preferences

Several readers wrote to educate me on the App Store preferences. They should be in the App Store app, right? Wrong. They are in System Preferences.

Such a step backwards—I could understand Software Update... just fine. But I don’t think of the App Store app as system software. Had me fooled for sure. And why can’t one preferences for App Store in the App Store app? Disjointed design.

In the past, I’ve unchecked every box except the download one, but I have noticed Apple resetting various preferences with system updates. So it seems that the auto push was enabled, probably at the 10.10.1 update. I certainly have never enabled the setting.

So I’ve now unchecked the Install system data files and security updates choice.

Apple pushes update without permission
Apple pushes update without permission

Year End Computer Purchases: Consult

A consulting client writes:

I have a 2009 Mac Pro (4 drives plus a four drive enclosure for backup plus other off-site backup) and a 2010 MacBook Pro, both of which likely need to be replaced.

My accountant has suggested that I do this before year end.

MPG: The tax year is indeed about to close. My consulting hours are flexible, and I work with clients all over the world. While I don’t Skype myself, clients can skype to me from virtually anywhere.

Suggested Boot/Master Volume Partitioning for Large SSD

How to use all that fast SSD space?

Suggested Boot/Master Volume Partitioning for Large SSD

Partitioning the OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro into two volumes
Partitioning the OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro into two volumes

OWC Turnkey Upgrade Program for Mac Pro

OWC’s Turnkey Upgrade Program for Mac Pro delivers CPU, memory, SSD and storage upgrades in one “do it all for me” program, supported by a vendor committed to Macs, the most recent addition being the 1TB or 2TB SSD options.

Virtualization for Safer Software Updates

Regarding, Procedure for Minimizing Risks with a Software Updater that Runs as 'root', Mark A writes with an excellent excellent suggestion of using virtualization via VirtualBox for the temporary bootable system:

I know this is obvious to you, being a software engineer like I am, but your readers may benefit from the understanding that a virtual hard drive can have its changes "rolled back" for free after such a potentially dangerous upgrade and restored to a condition ready for the next one.

Mac OS X is on the official virtualbox list of supported guest OSes. It's just a "normal" EFI-booted Intel OS. I believe Apple changed their license policy for hosting in a VM back in the Lion days.

https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Guest_OSes

There's the longer, hackier way ala http://www.robertsetiadi.net/install-os-x-virtualbox/

Or the way you suggest creating a pristine install and where I'd add a last step to clone the raw drive into a dmg image and then to a virtualbox image via https://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch08.html#idp59618720 so something like

$ VBoxManage convertfromraw NewImage.dmg NewImage.vdi --format VDI

And a young geek's view (the kind my son would probably prefer rather than actually reading instructions) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nod7cpxzxLc

 

Thunderbolt EFI Exploit

As if security weren’t hard enough, attaching a compromised Thunderbolt device can write the flash ROM on the computer. A system reinstall or drive replacement has no effect, since the EFI firmware is modified. You’d have to throw away the Mac—that is if you had any way of discovering the hack. This sort of thing is why high security users do things like glue USB3 ports shut and disconnect wireless and tape over cameras and so on. Certainly never, ever plug in a USB3 stick you find on the street (so to speak). Your good luck may be no accident.

Apple EFI Firmware Security Vulnerabilities

This sort of hardware vector is unnerving, because there are all sorts of waypoints betwen the manufacturing of a device and its delivery. And no conventional way to detect the exploit. MPG has little doubt that the NSA has used such techniques to compromise systems, not that such activities need be confined to spy agencies.

Additionally, other Thunderbolt devices' Option ROMs are writable from code that runs during the early boot and the bootkit could write copies of itself to new Thunderbolt devices. The devices remain functional, which would allow a stealthy bootkit to spread across air-gap security perimeters through shared Thunderbolt devices.

More unnevering is that Apple would store a certificate in writeable flash memory, which can simply be overwritten. And that this bug has been known for two years and that it can be fixed, but has not been fixed.

Last Minute Deals: Discounted Mac Pro, Deal Zone, and Oatmeal

The mass shopping murmuration reaches its climax right around now. But it will come down soon.

OWC has a bunch of stuff on sale and Cyber Savers and used Macs and displays.

For stocking stuffers sure to enthrall your kids, get 'em a few bags of Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Thick Oats at Amazon. Well, they can make cookies heh heh.

Mac Pro

Looking for a Mac Pro? For general photography, the 6-core Mac Pro is the sweet spot. See my review of the 2013 Mac Pro over at MacPerformanceGuide.com.

Don’t forget 64GB 2013 Mac Pro memory at OWC.

B&H Photo has many 2013 Mac Pro models discounted by $250 to $400, with free one day shipping. MPG strongly recommends Mac Pro with the 1TB flash drive, or at least the 512TB flash drive, but you can upgrade to 1TB or 2TB SSD later. The B&H Photo DEAL ZONE has a few interesting smaller items.

TESTED: OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro with Photoshop

Excellent real world performance.

OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro as Photoshop Scratch Disk for diglloydHuge Benchmark

OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro as a scratch disk for Photoshop
OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro as a scratch disk for Photoshop

Procedure for Minimizing Risks with a Software Updater that Runs as 'root'

This follows:

Sea Change: Security is Your Job Also, the Writing is on the Wall.

Sony Pictures Hacked: Do You Really Want to Update your Camera Firmware with a Sony Updater that Runs as 'root'?

This discussion actually applies to any software updater, signed or not, for a camera or anything. Because as the Sony fiasco shows, private keys can be stolen.

Even a signed app or updater does not preclude a version modified to contain malware by a hacker who cracks a stolen private key file. And then signs the app so that it looks legitimate*.

  1. Erase a drive, and clone the system to it. (see also How to upgrade your system/boot drive).
  2. Disconnect all drives including the original system drive. Or at least dismount the volumes (sophisticated malware can still infect at the driver level though).
  3. Boot off the clone.
  4. Download the updater, update the camera. Of course, infected firmware could still infect the camera, but the only solution to that is never to update firmware. And even then, really good malware might infect modifiable firmare RAM. Well, it’s all odds.
  5. Disconnect the clone.
  6. Reconnect previous devices, boot up.
  7. Ideally, physically destroy the clone drive (e.g hammer and saw, so to speak). Alternately (and carrying some risk), connect the clone drive (do not boot off it!) then using Disk Utility, erase it, then wipe all blocks (one pass secure erase). SoftRAID 5 also has an even better “Wipe” function.

Obviously if the update is for software you want on your computer, you’re out of luck—in it goes.

You want that software on your system—or do you? It is why MPG installs only absolutely essential software and loathes vendors deliver crapware and automated agents of various kinds. More software means more updates, each of which is a potential vector for compromise.

* That is why it is so critical that a vendor immediately revoke a certificate if there is any suspicion of the private key having been obtained, encrypted or not.

For that matter, a computer containing the private key that signs software should ideally never be connected to the internet. Certainly the private key should not be on a laptop taken for travel. But given reality, the password for the private key should be very long and complex.

Another option — virtualization

Mark A writes with an excellent suggestion of using virtualization via VirtualBox for the temporary bootable system:

I know this is obvious to you, being a software engineer like I am, but your readers may benefit from the understanding that a virtual hard drive can have its changes "rolled back" for free after such a potentially dangerous upgrade and restored to a condition ready for the next one.

Mac OS X is on the official virtualbox list of supported guest OSes. It's just a "normal" EFI-booted Intel OS. I believe Apple changed their license policy for hosting in a VM back in the Lion days.

https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Guest_OSes

There's the longer, hackier way ala http://www.robertsetiadi.net/install-os-x-virtualbox/

Or the way you suggest creating a pristine install and where I'd add a last step to clone the raw drive into a dmg image and then to a virtualbox image via https://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch08.html#idp59618720 so something like

$ VBoxManage convertfromraw NewImage.dmg NewImage.vdi --format VDI

And a young geek's view (the kind my son would probably prefer rather than actually reading instructions) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nod7cpxzxLc

Sea Change: Security is Your Job Also, the Writing is on the Wall

With the recent and ongoing security breaches at Sony Pictures, a chilling new level of risk has emerged that is pummeling Sony*, but applies to any entity, including Apple and Google. No company has perfect security nor will it ever, period.

Sony Pictures Hacked: Do You Really Want to Update your Camera Firmware with a Sony Updater that Runs as 'root'?

Sony Firmware Updater: a Security Risk

* Reportedly, Sony has shut down filming because hackers have rendered its payment systems inoperable!

See also A concise history of recent Sony hacks (MPG takes no position on the material at that link).

Security is YOUR job too

This is a general discussion, and while specifics are used, the issues span a much larger space than detailed here.

This has always been true, but the risks have never been harder to understand or more concerning, nor has there every been more inter-connected. Then think bank and brokerage accounts, which in MPG’s view, should not be used via the web, though admittedly that is a huge hassle these days. A system compromise of any kind potentially delivers the juiciest prize: draining money from your account to a hacker somewhere.

Risk for which you by law have no choice and no control: MPG vehemently objects to electronic medical and tax records. For reasons that should be obvious given the Sony fiasco, e.g. the government is incompetent to protect those records from determined hackers. Edward Snowden showed that even our “spooks” with the most highly classified information and strictest procedures can be compromised.

MPG advises readers to disavow cameras that require software updaters or USB transfers or charging (USB also has exploits when connected to the computer):

Computer code that can turn almost any device that connects via USB into a cyber-attack platform has been shared online.

You camera and your computer

Sony and certain other camera vendors provide software updaters that run on the computer in order to upgrade camera firmware. Moreover, the Sony updater (and some other brands) must be run as 'root' (no security restrictions). A software updater that must be run on the computer with root access is a fundamentally flawed design; it is a potential “root kit” vector. Other vendors like Nikon and Canon provide downloadable firmware that the camera itself can load**.

Patient: “Doctor, it hurts when I do that”.
Doctor: “Don’t do that!”.

It cannot be fixed except by doing it properly: no software updater at all. The camera itself should accept a firmware file, taking the computer out of the loop, at least in the sense of running 'root' capable software. Because either the updater or the firmware could compromise (hack into) the system, and the user would have no way to tell (well written malware is invisible).

The writing is on the wall. Meaning that all Sony software of any kind must now be suspect as potentially harboring malware, either now or some time down the line. There can be no assumption that it is “only Sony Pictures” or similar naive ostriches.

As this was written, it appears that Sony had not revoked the certificates for the compromised PFX (private key) files. If true, that a (non) act of gross negligence that in MPG’s view carries the prospect of awesome financial and legal liabilities, should the private keys be cracked and used for unsavory purposes.

** There are no zero risk approaches to updating camera firmware, but a binary file that the computer does not execute carries a much lower level of risk than having to run software, especially software that executes as “root”.

 

TESTED: OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro (first + only internal 2TB SSD for Mac Pro)

The only 2TB internal SSD for the 2023 Mac Pro offers great performance in a very high capacity.

Sustained Transfer Speed for Large Transfers

Transfer speed from 32K to 512MB

OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro: sustained transfer speed with large transfers
OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro: sustained transfer speed with large transfers
OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro
OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro: transfer speed from 32K to 512MB

OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro

The highest capacity SSD (“flash drive”) that Apple sells for the 2013 Mac Pro is 1TB, and there is no upgrade option.

The OWC Aura SSD for Mac Pro addresses both issues with a nice kicker in being able to use the the original Apple flash drive as well.

  • User installable module in 1TB or 2TB capacity.
  • Original SSD installs in the Mercury Envoy Pro SSD enclosure (INCLUDED). This is a very nice sleek portable bus powered enclosure.

Performance results coming tomorrow here at MPG.

More information on the OWC Aura SSD for Mac Pro.

OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro
OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro

OWC Announces Aura SSD as Industry’s First SSD Upgrade for the 2013 Mac Pro and Availability for Pre-Order

Custom-engineered DIY Solution with 1TB and 2TB Capacities Delivers Up to 8x the Capacity of Factory Shipping Models

Woodstock, IL – December 9, 2014 – Other World Computing (OWC), a leading zero emissions Mac and PC technology company, today announced new 1TB and 2TB Aura SSD upgrades for the 2013 Mac Pro. With the announcement, OWC becomes the first to offer an easy, cost-effective DIY solution for upgrading the capacity of the 2013 Mac Pro. Custom engineered specifically for the 2013 Mac Pro and fully tested for compatibility, speed and reliability, the new Aura SSD for Mac Pro delivers the capacity and performance Mac Pro users need for high-speed production workflows in audio, film, photo, and graphics.

OWC Aura SSD upgrades for the 2013 Mac Pro are available for pre-order starting at $899 for the 1TB model and $1449 for the 2TB model. The kits come with all of the tools necessary for a simplified DIY upgrade, including a ­comprehensive step-by-step installation video and ­24/7 award-winning, U.S.-based technical support.

Since the first Mac Pro in 2006, OWC has been a leading provider of award-winning computer upgrades and enhancement products for every Mac Pro model Apple has introduced. Building on this experience, OWC’s new Aura SSDs for Mac Pro 2013 feature:

Industry leading controller technologies for enhanced reliability
Engineered for Mac – no extra software or hacks needed
Designed and assembled in the USA
Transfer speeds up to 730 MB/s
3-year limited warranty

Bonus: Use your original SSD as a portable USB 3.0 drive

Included with the Aura SSD for Mac Pro kit, your original Mac Pro factory-installed SSD can be repurposed in OWC’s sleek, award-winning OWC Envoy Pro external enclosure to create a new, blazing-fast external USB 3.0 drive.
“Upgrading with an Aura SSD provides Mac Pro users the option to get the additional capacity they need now, rather than waiting for the next upgrade cycle,” said Larry O'Connor, Founder and CEO, OWC. “The solid performance and increased capacity means an enhanced experience for professional workflows.”

Pricing and Pre-Sale Offer for the New OWC Aura SSD for 2013 Mac Pro:

1.0TB Aura SSD $899
2.0TB Aura SSD $1479

The OWC Aura SSD for Mac Pro is now available for pre-orders with an estimated ship date of 2 to 3 weeks.

Learn more and order the OWC Aura SSD for Mac Pro today: https://eshop.macsales.com/preorder/OWC-Aura-SSD-for-Mac-Pro/

Visit the OWC Mac Selection Guide where you can easily find an OWC SSD for nearly every Apple Mac model.

About OWC
OWC is the manufacturer and upgrade provider of choice for Apple and PC enthusiasts and has been providing OWC Memory upgrades for Apple computers since the mid-90s. For the last decade, OWC has been building SSD upgrades specifically for Apple computers, winning multiple awards while also earning accolades for OWC External Drives and OWC Optical Drives. Widely recognized for its exemplary customer service, OWC provides extensive US-based technical support for Mac and PC users around the world. As a member of the Apple Developer Program, OWC also produces a catalog of upgrades and accessories, having served the Apple community worldwide since 1988.

OWC Mercury Electra 6G 960GB SSD: RAID-0 Striping vs RAID-5 vs RAID-4 vs RAID-10

No matter how tested, the OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G delivers outstanding results. As a RAID-qualified drive, it’s a terrific choice for the OWC Thunderbay 4 Mini.

OWC Mercury Electra 960GB — RAID-5, RAID-4, RAID-0, RAID 1+0

Write/read speed, plus hashing throughput with IntegrityChecker, RAID-0 vs RAID-4 vs RAID-5
Write/read speed, plus hashing throughput with IntegrityChecker, RAID-0 vs RAID-4 vs RAID-5

Site Maintenance this evening.

17:20 PST — This site might be erratic or unreachable for short periods tonight as some server upgrades are performed.

20:00 PST — server update finished, no known issues.

OWC Mercury Electra 6G 960GB SSD: Stunning Performance in Thunderbay Mini: Throughput, Photoshop, Incompressible Data Too

This performance represents best of breed and is even faster than the 240GB SSDs tested last month.

OWC Mercury Electra 6G 960GB SSD: Aggregate Throughput in OWC Thunderbay Mini

If you’re looking for the fastest, this is the ticket. The huge price drop to about $449 makes 4 X 1TB as a stripe or RAID-4 or RAID-5 highly attractive to any alternatives: that’s 3TB usable capacity (RAID-4 or RAID-5) or 4TB usable capacity (RAID-0).

OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G SSD: aggregate throughput using Thunderbay Mini
OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G SSD: aggregate throughput using Thunderbay Mini

Also impressive is the performance with incompressible data.

OWC Mercury Electra 6G 960GB SSD: Zeroes vs Incompressible

OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G SSD: zeroes vs incompressible data
OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G SSD: zeroes vs incompressible data

And for total real world, it’s as good as its Extreme Pro 6G sibling.

OWC Mercury Electra 6G 960GB SSD: diglloydHuge Photoshop Benchmark

OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G SSD: zeroes vs incompressible data
OWC 960GB Mercury Electra 6G SSD: zeroes vs incompressible data

OWC Offers 1TB SSD for $449

A new SDD from OWC, the 1TB Mercury Electra™ 6G SSD for only $449.

With 7% over-provisioning, far more than many brands: flash RAM fails over time.

Note that the drive is qualified for RAID. MPG will be testing four of these in the Thunderbay 4 Mini.

Though not yet listed, the Electra 6G 1TB can be used in the OWC Mercury Elite Pro Mini enclosure using bus power (about $34). OWC will probably soon offer this combination directly.

OWC 1TB Mercury Electra™ 6G SSD
OWC 1TB Mercury Electra™ 6G SSD

Specs

  • Form Factor 2.5"Capacity
  • 960GB useable capacity
    Total Flash Memory Components – 1024GB
    64GB allocated to real-time data redundancy & error correction
  • Flash controller: Silicon Motion SM2246EN Series with 7% Over Provisioning firmware set
  • Interface: SATA 6Gb/s, 3Gb/s & 1.5Gb/s supported, SATA 3.0 Compliant
  • NAND: Tier 1 Asynchronous NAND Flash
  • RAID Support: Qualified for single drive and multiple drive production workstation RAID 0/1/10/0+1 and SPAN usage
  • SMART Attributes Standard
  • Native Command Queuing: up to 32 commands
  • AHCI Compliant: Yes
  • Format: Unformatted (Instructions on formatting here)

B&H Photo: Apple Mac Pro for $2599

See review of the 2013 Apple Mac Pro.

Apple Mac Pro Quad-Core $2599 (instant savings of $400). AppleCare at B&H is also discounted substantially over the Apple Store price. AppleCare for 2013 Mac Pro.

The CPU in the 2013 Mac Pro can be upgraded after the fact, and thus it is a solid investment to start with—many users will find 4 cores more than adequate.

View all Mac Pro models

Big Discounts on Storage

See also photography deals at B&H Photo.

Big discounts on storage including $250 - $300 off various Thunderbay 4.

See MPG’s view on the Thunderbay in Simplify Your Storage: Fast, Reliable, Expandable.

Various desktop hard drives are on sale.

Laptop drives

Got an older laptop? See Making an Old Dog of a Laptop Run Like a Young Puppy, Make Lightroom or Photoshop Fly.

Laptop users should have a bus-powered backup drive for travel at the least.

How can you beat a 750GB hybrid HD/SSD for only $54? But all the 2.5 inch drives are on sale.

More OWC Holiday deals

Adobe DreamWeaver CC 2014 Does Not Launch! How to Fix Preference Permissions

Installing and uninstalling Adobe DreamWeaver CC 2014 several times resulted in no luck getting the installed DreamWeaver Application to launch.

Symptom: double-click to launch results in a brief blink and then nothing (fractional second failure). No error message, never even gets near the startup scfeen.

All other Adobe apps including CC 2014 have been running just fine.

A tech support call to Adobe India was pretty much as expected, except one clue emerged: the app would launch if a new admin account were created and it was run in that account. Adobe then punted and had nothing to suggest except “call your IT department”. Which I did, since that is myself.

So I went hunting.

Root cause

Two Adobe folders were set to owner root and group wheel:

diglloydMP:Preferences lloyd$ pwd
/Users/lloyd/Library/Preferences diglloydMP:Preferences lloyd$ ls -ld Adobe "ExtendScript Toolkit" drwxrwxr-x+ 27 root wheel 918 Jan 22 2014 Adobe drwxrwxr-x+ 6 root wheel 204 Jan 31 2014 ExtendScript Toolkit

As can be seen permissions generally allowed world access but something must have been off on some subfolder such that DreamWeaver CC 2014 could not read or write some crucial file. Having just installed it, this is a little odd for an installer not to check its own folders. It’s also bad code (bug) to not report critical errors.

Why these folders had these permissions is unclear (I would never have done so). Perhaps a past Adobe installer bug. Such permissions can be quite nasty: owner root with executable bits set can compromise the entire system. But I did not investigate deeper; I just wanted to fix it.

To look for “nasties”, use this command (in bold); it might find a few things that are normally owned by root, but normal applications should generally never do so.

find . -uid root -print0 | xargs -0 ls -ld

Fixing owner/group/permissions

This fix is using Terminal (no other way to do it).

The # lines are comments; the rest are command line commands to run in Terminal. “lloyd” here is the account login name for the account in use.

# change to Preferences dir and see what permissions are there
cd ~/Library/Preferences
ls -ld Adobe "ExtendScript Toolkit"

# change owner to 'lloyd' and group to 'staff
sudo chown -R lloyd Adobe "ExtendScript Toolkit"
sudo chgrp -R staff Adobe "ExtendScript Toolkit"

# all permissions for owner, deny permissions to all others 
chmod -R 700 Adobe "ExtendScript Toolkit"

When done, permissions should look like this:

  diglloydMP:Preferences lloyd$ ls -ld Adobe "ExtendScript Toolkit"
  drwx------+ 29 lloyd  staff  986 Dec  1 12:08 Adobe
  drwx------+  6 lloyd  staff  204 Jan 31  2014 ExtendScript Toolkit

So all is well, right?

Not exactly. DW CC 2014 runs, but the intervals between rainbow beachball hangs averages 2 minutes. It is the biggest piece of crap MPG has ever used, beating only DW 5.5 for the title: MPG has used DW 5.5 for years; it is rife with bugs but can generally be used for reasonable periods of time until it crashes.

When the “Continue Trial?” dialog pops up, the world “trial” certainly takes on an appropriate meaning.

OWC Holiday Deals

See also photography deals at B&H Photo.

OWC Holiday deals

My favorite peripheral remains the OWC Thunderbay 4. The RAID-5 edition with bring-your-own-drives is just $557 and the base unit (no drives) is $449.

Fast 3TB hard drives for only $107. Preferred drive at MPG is the fast 5TB Toshiba for $199.

You can make an old dog laptop feel like a puppy: great deals on SSD including just $249 for a 480GB SSD.

Don’t forget an excellent USB3 hub and fast USB3 card reader.

Quality Products at Competitive Prices + Expert 24/7 Support. That's the OWC Difference.

CyberMonday Savings + Amazon Instant up to $50 off + Delivery from $1.49 or even Zero = +++. Current Amazon Instant up to $50 off ends after today.

Now 400+ ‘CyberMonday’ Featured.

Free Delivery within the USA on Memory and light orders $25 & up; most any order $79 & up within the contiguous 48 US States + International options from just $2.99!

RAID-0 vs RAID-4 or RAID-5: Does the CPU Usage Matter?

RAID-4 with SSDs in the Thunderbay Mini is quite impressive. MPG has updated the analysis to include RAID-5, RAID-4, and 3 and 4-drive RAID-0 stripes.

Real World Throughput for RAID-0 vs RAID-4 vs RAID-5

Write/read speed, plus hashing throughput with IntegrityChecker, RAID-0 vs RAID-4 vs RAID-5
Write/read speed, plus hashing throughput with IntegrityChecker, RAID-0 vs RAID-4 vs RAID-5

Heat Your House with Someone Else’s Computers

Cool stuff. Well, warm stuff!

Heat Your House with Someone Else's Computers

Cloud&Heat is a German company that has started offering “distributed cloud heaters,” which are big insulated metal cabinets that access your water tank and are crammed with hard drives, controller boards, and some fans.

The idea is that you’d buy and install one of these cabinets for about the same cost as a conventional heating system, and hook it up to your ducting, water system, electricity (3 phase at 400v), and Internet (at least 50 Mbit/s).

Cloud&Heat pays for the Internet connection and the power required to keep it running, and you get as much warm air and hot water as the servers in the box can produce, free of charge, as it quietly performs cloud computing tasks.

A Pseudo-Security Trend: Password Reset and Locked Accounts

Last Friday, I was locked out of one of my email accounts by the provider because of “too many failed login attempts”.

None of which I made—it was someone trying to hack my account. I was told that this is a new “security feature”. But I have a good password, and I don’t want to be locked out of my account at any time.

In my case, I had to wait all weekend for a password reset, since this particular organization was closed on weekends. This pretty much makes this email provider useless for anything but trivial stuff; the account could be locked at any time.

What such security features really do is to play into the hands of hackers, allowing trivially easy denial of service attacks. Denial of service attacks are typically in the context of web sites (overwhelming a site), but can be applied to email or any kind of login account on a web site. For example:

  1. Dig up 100 million email addresses (many ways to do this).
  2. Fake login attempts N+1 times, where N is the cutoff for locking the account. Starting Friday night of course, so customer support staff are thinned out.
  3. Sit back and laugh as 100 million users find themselves locked out of their email, if only for a day or two.
  4. Repeat each day (hey, bot nets are cheap).

Variations include targeting specific providers. Web sites that lock accounts this way are in essence implementing denial of service support for hackers.

There are many other ways to approach this, other than this crude bludgeon. For starters, allowing the user to decline this behavior (perhaps requiring an especially strong password), an option to notify a user about activity, additional prompts if a login occurs after failures, two factor authentication including apps like Authy, etc.

Corollary — nuisance messsages from “password reset” dialogs

Apple provides an iForgot.apple.com site to reset a password. It’s an ongoing headache for me, since Apple kicks me over there if I type my password wrong just twice (which I do sometimes do if my hands are stiff and cold). Very annoying behavior. But 1Password eliminates that issue for me now. Except not in iTunes or the AppStore, where 1Password doesn’t apply. So it still gets me on a regular basis.

That is relatively minor. The bigger headache is the regular recept of this message below, which is some hacker-generated thing (not me). And sometimes this is followed or preceded by an Apple “account locked” email, similar to that discussed above. Ditto for my Apple Developer account, which generally locks me out every month or so.

Nuisance email

2-factor authentication

Apple has a 2-step authentication approach for purchases, but it’s unclear if it has been applied the idea to the above nuisance factors. Now enabled, MPG will soon see.

Apple 2-step verification security
Apple 2-step verification security enabled

OS X Yosemite Update (10.1): Regularly Deletes the AppleMail VIP List

Last week I wrote that OS X Yosemite had deleted my Apple Mail VIP list AGAIN.

Well, it’s now gone yet again showing that Apple Mail in Yosemite deletes the VIP for whatever reason, and that it’s not an update issue but a general bug.

The deletion renders the feature useless, because the list just disappears for no apparent reason.

UPDATE 2 days later: deleted again. Rampant Apple Core Rot, just one data point of many.

RAID-0 vs RAID-4 or RAID-5: Does the CPU Usage Matter?

One reader expressed concern that the CPU usage required for parity calculations during writes would chew up too much CPU power. This concern is put to rest in this analysis:

CPU Usage for RAID-0 vs RAID-4 or RAID -5

Throughput of hashing speed with IntegrityChecker, RAID-0 vs RAID-4 SSDs
Throughput of hashing speed with IntegrityChecker, RAID-0 vs RAID-4 SSDs
~130% CPU Usage for RAID-4 or RAID-5 during intensive write  (during disktester fill-volume test)
~130% CPU Usage for RAID-4 or RAID-5 during intensive write
(during disktester fill-volume test)

RAID-5 vs RAID-4: Which is Faster?

RAID-4 is striping with a dedicated parity drive
RAID-5 is striping with distributed parity

Interesting finding in favor of RAID-4 for read speed.

RAID-5 vs RAID-4 with SSDs

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OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, RAID-4 vs RAID-5 for varying transfer size
OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, RAID-4 vs RAID-5 for varying transfer size

RAID: Performance vs Transfer Size

Stripe size is typically 64K, which means that the data is split across drives in 64K chunks. It could be 32K or 16K or 128K and so on; minor efficiencies can be had by choosing for specific types of access.

RAID-0 striping and RAID-5 striping with parity offer much higher performance than with a single drive under the right conditions.

Peak RAID performance is realized only when the I/O transfer size is substantially larger than stripe size, which allows the multiple drives in a RAID to operate in parallel (simultaneously). This is where the speed gains of RAID striping variants come from.

For example, with a stripe size of 64K, reading 256K of data allows 4 drives to each read 64K in parallel (assuming best-case alignment at 256K boundaries, but this is often not the case). Doubling that to 512K ensures higher efficiency, but even with 1MB transfers, peak performance is still only about 65% of peak peformance for RAID-0, as the graph shows.

Since many programs read/write in relatively small chunks, the full performance potential of RAID is often unrealized for real-world applications.

As a user, there is generally nothing you can do about this; it’s the application making the decision. For example, Photoshop uses ~ 1MB chunks for reading and writing its scratch disk, an anachronism that Adobe really ought to fix: observe on the graph below that 1MB I/O size yields much less than the peak performance. It is why a single very fast SSD can perform so well even relative to a RAID, see Thunderbay Mini with SSDs as a Photoshop Scratch Disk.

Shown below are two graphs, one for RAID-0 and one for RAID-5. Click through for article and then click the graphs for a much larger view.

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Transfer speed vs transfer size , RAID-0 (SoftRAID 5.0.5)
Transfer speed vs transfer size , RAID-0 (SoftRAID 5.0.5)
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Transfer speed vs transfer size , RAID-5 (SoftRAID 5.0.5)
Transfer speed vs transfer size , RAID-5 (SoftRAID 5.0.5)

Any Kind of RAID is Easy with SoftRAID

See also Software RAID Performance with SoftRAID 5 as well as recent tests of the OWC Thunderbay Mini using SoftRAID.

SoftRAID makes creating RAID easy: just select the drives, choose the desired total capacity, click—done. No need to think about partitioning or other nerd stuff.

See Initializing with New Drives page in my review of the OWC Thunderbay Mini for some examples.

If the drives are brand-new and thus never formatted, first select the drive(s) and then choose Disk => Initialize.

Shown below is how easy it is:

  1. Select the 4 drives, then Volume -=> New.
  2. Choose the type of RAID you’d like (RAID-5 is ideal with 4 drives), enter the desired volume size (this is the way to make more than one volume without having to think about partitioning).
  3. Cick Create.
Creating a RAID-5 volume in SoftRAID 5
Creating a RAID-5 volume in SoftRAID 5

diglloydTools Updated to version 2.2.9

diglloydTools

diglloydTools has been updated to version 2.2.9. Download page.

Purchase diglloydTools.

  • Modified default transfer size for various commands to a larger value (128MB) which is more in line with the hyper fast SSDs available today.
  • Fixed bug in which reported MB/sec was too high when using double async buffers in fill-volume with very fast SSDs.
  • Removed verify option from read-files and fill-volume; this is properly handled by test-reliability, and verification causes certain measurement difficulties with very fast SSDs. The double async buffer case is now a very tight loop and shows more consistent MB/sec readings.
  • Fixed erroneous MB/sec and time in sequential testing (intermediate message during testing).
  • Standard deviation is now reported with some test results.

Some of the capabilities in diglloydTools

Aside from testing hard drive or SSD or RAID performance and reliability with DiskTester, data integrity with IntegrityChecker is a must-have workflow tool for anyone with important data:

diglloydTools graphing template
diglloydTools graphing template

Email Notifications for Site Updates

An email notification service is in place for subscribers at diglloyd.com . At this time the list is only for subscribers (that includes diglloydTools).

Email updates are for diglloyd.com and/or MacPerformanceGuide.com and/or WindInMyFace.com. Each site gets its own email, so if all three sites change on any given day, you’d receive three emails, one per site (weekly choice would be one per week).

Specify: diglloyd and/or mac and/or wind. Details...

The list is opt-in, meaning that unless you ask to be put onto the list, you will not get email notifications of site updates. You can choose daily or weekly updates.

What an Impaired SSD Looks Like

This SSD below had seen some use. The red line for writes was its performance as I began testing it: very poor performance dropping to a stunningly low 30 MB/sec.

The orange line is following DiskTester recondition (DiskTester is part of diglloydTools).

Some SSDs benefit, and some do not but at least in this case, performance has held up since, at about 6X the speed of the impaired starting behavior.

Generally speaking, read speeds are unaffected and remain high, but it is write speeds that suffer when an SSD is ailing. And in general, one should be cautious about making regular backups when an SSD starts to behave like this.

Click for large graph. The graph shows writing and reading the entire drive capacity (MB/sec, 1000 large files to fill), before and after recondition.

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Before and after DiskTester recondition on impaired SSD
Before and after DiskTester recondition on impaired SSD

SoftRAID 5.0.5 Released

See also Software RAID Performance with SoftRAID 5 as well as recent tests of the OWC Thunderbay Mini using SoftRAID.

A few of the release notes in SoftRAID 5.0.5 are interesting:

  • Your Mac may hang at shutdown if your remove a SoftRAID disk while your Mac is running. This bug only occurs if the disk is connected via SATA (or SATA over Thunderbolt) and you are running Mac OS X 10.9 or 10.10. We have tracked it down to a problem with the Apple SATA driver and are currently working with Apple engineers on a fix.
  • RAID volumes on USB disks are unreliable. We believe this is due to bugs in Apple USB driver and are currently working with Apple engineers on a fix.
  • There is an incompatibility between VMWare Fusion and SoftRAID volumes. We are currently investigating this
  • The SoftRAID driver now logs any illegal requests it receives for SoftRAID volumes. Log entries are written to the softraid.log file. This logging was added to help investigate bugs in other applications.!
  • Added code to detect modification of the SoftRAID application and driver. Users who run MacKeeper were unable to mount SoftRAID volumes when running Yosemite, Mac OS X 10.10. This was the result of MacKeeper modifying the code in the SoftRAID application and driver. This version of SoftRAID detects these modifications and tells !the user to download a new copy of SoftRAID.

MPG: Stick to Thunderbolt for RAID (or internal drives or SATA or miniSAS on older Macs).

OS X Yosemite Finder File Copy: Data Loss

MPG has never trusted Finder file copy across a network, having observed failures to copy changed items, as well as total-death system lockups more than once in past OS X releases.

Today I observed the OS X Finder copy a file to my other machine, delivering a zero-byte result after a short pause: no report of error and the normal sound played at the end of the copy. In short, total data loss (of the copy) with no warning whatsoever. Fortunately I had the original but had a move been done (by holding down the command key while dragging), the file would have been lost.

Such inexcusable bugs* are a good reason to use IntegrityChecker after a network copy operation, or after any important data transfer.

This was using WiFi; MPG normally uses only gigabit ethernet, but the MBP is short one Thunderbolt port while testing, until the OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock arrives.

* Network failures with WiFi are not uncommon; any file copying algorithm has to assume that a failure could occur, and report the error!

OWC ThunderBay Mini Performance with Four SSDs

Thunderbay Mini sales page at OWC.

Configured with 4 SSDs, the OWC Thunderbay Mini outruns even the lightning-fast 1TB SSD in the MacBook Pro Retina.

Thunderbay Mini with SSDs as a Photoshop Scratch Disk

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OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: Photoshop scratch disk vs MacBook Pro Retina 1TB internal SSD
OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: Photoshop scratch disk vs MacBook Pro Retina 1TB internal SSD

OWC ThunderBay Mini Performance with Four SSDs

Thunderbay Mini sales page at OWC.

The OWC Thunderbay 4 Mini is a very fast little box with four SSDs.

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OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, aggregate throughput
OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, aggregate throughput
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OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, transfer speed vs transfer size
OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, transfer speed vs transfer size
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OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, large transfers with RAID-0, RAID-5, RAID 1+0
OWC Thunderbay Mini performance: 4 OWC 6G SSDs, large transfers with RAID-0, RAID-5, RAID 1+0

OS X Yosemite: Problems From “system cleanup” Software

MPG has a strong distaste for “system cleanup” software. Here’s a specific case where problems occur, but it is not the only ill that can result. Avoid such “system maintainance” or similar software.

When Apple started shipping Yosemite, we started getting complaints from customers that they couldn't use SoftRAID volumes. We would ask them to reinstall the SoftRAID driver and use other similar tricks, but still the volumes would not mount. After a couple of days of investigation, we discovered that the SoftRAID driver was getting modified.

Yosemite increases the security of Mac OS X by always checking the validity of drivers, any drivers which have been modified will not load. The question was how was our driver getting modified.

We went back to our users and asked them what utility software they had installed. Out of the 6 users who first encountered this problem, all 6 had MacKeeper installed. We asked them to uninstall MacKeeper and download a fresh copy of SoftRAID from our web site. Then we asked them to reinstall the driver using the newly downloaded copy of SoftRAID. After that, all of them were able to mount their SoftRAID volumes.

MPG: MacKeeper was deleting the 32-bit portion of the binary to save space. But that portion is also digitally signed. So the signature check fails, and OS X Yosemite refuses to load the kext.

Any software messing with things like kernel extensions should be taken out to the woodshed. Keep your system lean and clean to avoid problems: install only the things that are absolutely essential.

OS X Yosemite: Update the SoftRAID Driver

MPG thinks that Apple code quality and quality assurance in OS X are both in a downtrend (and apparently accelerating), but it’s particularly worrisome when software is whacked at the kext level.

According to Tim Standing of SoftRAID, OS Yosemite installation corrupts SoftRAID by writing over a more current driver (version 5.0.3 is written over version 5.0.4, a bug report has been filed). No harm done, but run the SoftRAID app to update the driver back to the most recent version.

Once our customers started upgrading to the latest version of Yosemite, 10.10.1, some of them started having problems. Their SoftRAID volumes would no longer appear on the desktop. We started investigating this after today.

After repeating the upgrade process from 10.10 to 10.10.1 ten times in our lab, we found that Apple's update software modifies the SoftRAID driver about half the time. Once the SoftRAID driver gets modified, the Yosemite system software will no longer load it. This leaves customers wondering what went wrong.

The solution is to use the SoftRAID application to reinstall the SoftRAID driver.

Run SoftRAID.app to update the driver after OS X Yosemite installation

OS X Yosemite: TRIM

MPG spoke with driver expert Tim Standing of SoftRAID today about TRIM for SSDs and OS X Yosemite, to better understand the issue.

Online reports are that OS X Yosemite no longer supports TRIM for non-Apple SSDs. This is true.

Furthermore, use of a tool that enables TRIM on an SSD causes the system to become non-bootable, because Yosemite sees that a key 'kext' has been modified.

Users who have not upgraded to Yosemite that have used a TRIM-enable tool should be aware of this, and revert before upgrading to Yosemite.

MPG has not recommended SSDs that need TRIM for various reasons, but this is the latest development that really makes such SSDs unpalatable. OWC SSDs do not need TRIM, and MPG has been running them for years, thus avoiding the issue entirely.

Checking whether TRIM is enabled

Choose Apple menu => About This Mac => System Report

Check for TRIM enabled: About This Mac => System Report
Check for TRIM enabled: About This Mac => System Report

4K Televisions Plummet in Price

My jaw dropped when I some of the discounts being offered on 4K televisions.

The iMac 5K is pretty darn nice for its screen, but the iMac 5K is $2500, and not a TV and doesn’t work for high quality streaming from Netflix or Amazon. Yet a 4K TV is stunning for cameras like the Panasonic GH4 and/or 4K streaming from Netflix.

Amazon also has 4K Sony TVs and 4K Samsung TVs at blowout prices.

For example, Sony XBR55X850B 55-Inch 4K Ultra HD for $1598.

OS X Yosemite: Disable WiFi if Using Gigabit Ethernet

Many users find WiFi convenient (of course!). And it’s essential for iPhone and iPad and many televisions (streaming), etc.

But for computers, MPG strongly recommends gigabit ethernet instead of WiFi. WiFi at its best is inferior to gigabit ethernet, flaky from various types of interference, less secure, and comes with high latency that results in (for example) excruciatingly slow file copies, particularly for many small files.

Multiple computers on gigabit ethernet reno problem; wire them into a good WiFi router with multiple gigabit ethernet ports, and add an inexpensive ethernet switch for more ports.

Mark A writes:

Under Mavericks, I had ethernet priority over WiFi and Yosemite reset it without warning to favor WiFi.

So I was experiencing issues while the cable was plugged in and took me a while to realize the traffic wasn't wired as I'd set it and I didn't think to double check after an O/S upgrade.

MPG: Mark is correct, which I have confirmed by turning on WiFi, observing poor speeds rebooting, and continuing to observe poor speeds: WiFi is taking precedence over gigabit ethernet; it’s about 10X slower to load a graphics-intensive web page.

If you’re short on Thunderbolt ports (for a Thunderbolt to ethernet adapter), this is a good reason to get the OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock.

Disable WiFi when using Ethernet
Disable WiFi when using Ethernet

Yosemite

Yosemite is a point of confusion.

It’s one of my favorite haunts as a photographer: every email I get with “Yosemite” in the subject makes me think of the place, not the OS.

Glacial Blue, Winter’s Icy Hint  Nikon D810 + Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon @ f/1.4
Glacial Blue, Winter’s Icy Hint
Nikon D810 + Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon @ f/1.4

OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock with 5 USB3 Ports (2 High Power), Gigabit Ethernet, Audio, HDMI, Daisy-Chainable

Especially for iMac and laptop and MacMini users (limited ports), the new OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock at $249 looks terrific.

MPG expects to have one for review: it’s been a nuisance having to plug and unplug gigabit ethernet to test certain things.

More info on the OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock

Laptop users will find one especially useful for a home docking station because all these ports are gained, and yet there are still two free Thunderbolt 2 ports. For example:

Ports on a Laptop
  Laptop alone With Thunderbolt 2 Dock
USB 3 ports 2 7
USB 3 high power ports 2 of 2 4 of 7
Thunderbolt 2 ports 2 2
Firewire with Thunderbolt to Firewire adapter
(uses Thunderbolt port)
1
Gigabit ethernet with Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapter
(uses Thunderbolt port)
1
HDMI possible with adapter
(uses Thunderbolt port)
1
Sound varies additional sound in and out
Digital camera card reader SDXC reader built-in on some models plug in a fast USB3 card reader
OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock, specifications
OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock, specifications
OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock, specifications
OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock, specifications

OS X Yosemite Deletes Java / JDK, but Photoshop Needs It

OS X Yosemite deletes an installed java, which MPG uses for writing server code and various other tasks. Not a very nice behavior at all.

The problem is, some parts of Photoshop (some types of scripting) require java.

JDK 1.6 for OS X (works OK on 10.10)

Java 8 for OS X 10.10

See also Information and system requirements for installing and using Oracle Java on Mac OS X and How can I find which version of Java is installed without running an applet in Windows or Mac?.

The whole thing is a mess in terms of transition: JDK 1.6 goes into the right directories and shows up on the command line but JDK 1.8 does not, and does not have the familiar directory structure, breaking scripts and builds (no doubt solvable but very confusing and annoying). MPG needs 1.6 for development purposes so it works out for now. Photoshop users should be fine either way.

Other tips:

  • Disable java in web browsers (strongly recommended).
  • Do NOT disable javascript in web browsers (entirely different thing from java).

OS X Yosemite Update (10.1): Destroys Apple Mail VIP List Again

Last week I wrote that OS X Yosemite had deleted my Apple Mail VIP list, a finding confirmed by others.

Today’s 10.1 update nuked it again.

And 10.1 does not fix the severe file open dialog performance issues.

On the plus side, Apple did not delete my JVM this time. At least there is one thing that did not go wrong.

Sean S writes:

Mavericks also deleted my Stars List - however, there is a small heading above the Mailboxes and just below the toolbar that shows the word VIPs - clicking on that restored my VIP list on the side. Hope it works for you, tho’ too easy I suspect.

MPG: this small text button is grayed-out and inoperable on my system, indicating that there are no email addresses in the email VIP list.

To hazard a guess, I’d bet this is related to the Cloud (dust storm?) I don’t sync my Contacts to the Cloud and I don’t want to, but everyone at Apple is euphorically titillated with the platform lock-in potential of the cloud. But MPG considers it a general security menace.

OWC Announces ThunderBay Mini: 4-bay Enclosure for 2.5-inch Drives, Thunderbolt v2

See previous comments on the Thunderbay Mini. MPG expects to have both SSD and HDD versions of the Thunderbay Mini in this week for testing.

Thunderbay Mini sales page at OWC.

OWC Thunderbay Mini — 4-bay enclosure with Thunderbolt 2 for SSD or HDD
OWC Thunderbay Mini — 4-bay enclosure with Thunderbolt 2 for SSD or HDD

Our External of the Year Just Went Portable with the ThunderBay 4 Mini, Delivering Big Performance in a Small Footprint – Now up to 8TB with Sustained Speeds of up to 1,284MB/s!

Woodstock, IL – November 17, 2014 – Other World Computing (OWC®) http://www.macsales.com, a leading zero emissions Mac upgrade and storage technology company, announced today the release of the innovative ThunderBay 4 mini and ThunderBay 4 mini RAID 5 Edition, which builds on the proven performance and flexibility of its second generation ThunderBay 4.

Big Performance. Small Footprint.
Easily transport your data between production environments with this portable, professional-grade Thunderbolt 2 RAID solution. Optimized for 2.5” drives, the ThunderBay 4 mini delivers outstanding performance and reliability for the most demanding applications, including workflows involving 4K, 2K, uncompressed HD, and multi-stream SD video. Expand production capabilities in industry-leading creative platforms like Final Cut X, Avid Pro Tools, and Adobe Lightroom.

Key Features:

• Four 2.5” drive bays, perfect for SSDs
• Breathtaking Thunderbolt 2 performance with sustained speeds of up to 1,284MB/s
• RAID-ready with up to 4TB of SSD storage (HDD up to 8TB)
• Near-silent operation
• SoftRAID 5 – first ever software RAID 5 for the Mac (available with ThunderBay 4 mini RAID 5 Edition)
• Flexibility to combine multiple ThunderBays into a single massive RAID array
• Regimented multi-hour drive “burn-in” for ultimate reliability

Thinking Outside the Enclosure

OWC unlocks the incredible performance and flexibility of ThunderBay by pairing the drives with a robust software RAID solution.

Powered by the SoftRAID engine, ThunderBay 4 mini RAID 5 Edition delivers advanced RAID modes, real-time health monitoring with email notifications, and best-in-class rebuild speeds.

Unlike traditional software RAID solutions, SoftRAID’s revolutionary volume optimization allows you to quickly configure your drive for specific workflows. Now you can experience the absolute best performance whether recording audio, editing 4K video, or creating a multimedia server.

“Our new ThunderBay 4 mini is perfect for mobile workflows involving demanding applications and large mission-critical files,” said Jen Soulé, OWC President. “The combination of RAID-ready capabilities and Thunderbolt 2 technology makes working with large 2K and 4K files easier, faster, and more flexible and affordable than ever before. Now users can get big performance in a small footprint – all in a portable, production-grade 4-Bay enclosure.”

The RAID 5 Advantage

Thunderbay 4 mini RAID 5 Edition is preconfigured in RAID 5 and supports RAID 0, 1, 4, 5, and 1+0 enabling you to achieve the optimal balance of storage, performance, and data-redundancy your workflow demands. With RAID 5, the four drives inside ThunderBay 4 mini are merged for increased capacity and tremendous performance gains over a single drive.

Special redundancy data, called “parity information,” is also stored across the drives, allowing your data to remain completely safe so you can maintain your mission-critical workflows worry-free.

Burn in

Each ThunderBay 4 mini undergoes OWC’s regimented multi-hour drive “burn-in” to ensure you experience the amazing performance of your drive right out of the box.

Includes:
- ThunderBay 4 mini external drive
- 1 meter, certified, Thunderbolt cable and set of keys for front panel lock
- User guide and utility software bundle (Mac and PC)

Pricing and Availability:

OWC’s ThunderBay 4 mini and ThunderBay 4 mini RAID 5 Edition are available for immediate ordering in the following configurations:

OWC Thunderbay Mini — 4-bay enclosure with Thunderbolt 2 for SSD or HDD
OWC Thunderbay Mini — 4-bay enclosure with Thunderbolt 2 for SSD or HDD

SSDs Are Not Created Equal

MPG regularly receives emails of “what about SSD Brand X”, often because specifications of some new variant impressed, or the price is $10 lower, or whatever. This is not the way any professional or serious user looking for reliable long-term use should select gear. It is why MPG recommends only gear tested and shown to work reliably here at MPG. Top recommendations go to gear that has shown solid service under heavy duty.

Many users presume an SSD is an SSD, assuming that all SSDs are pretty much the same. Which they sort of are, for light duty use and where performance over time doesn’t matter much.

But brands vary in media life management and more over provisioning. For example, a 250GB SSD has 256GB of flash memory, and a 240GB SSD has 256GB of flash memory. Think about that— one SSD has 6GB of spare flash, and another has 16GB of spare flash. And flash memory blocks fail over time. Connect the dots.

All SSDs can fail for various reasons. All one can do is play the odds. And if the ultimate in reliability is needed, enterprise-grade SSDs are the (pricey) ticket, though overkill for most all users.

Shown below is one brand that in a few days of testing showed a drop in media life from 39% to 31%, and had some severe write speed problems also (disktester recondition made a *huge* improvement). Note also that “hours of use” is a modest 191 hours.

Screen shot from SoftRAID 5.

Rapid loss of media life in common-brand SSD
Rapid loss of media life in common-brand SSD

After only 14 hours more steady usage (disktester test-reliability), look what has happened to the media life: it has declined from 31% to 28%, literally overnight.

Rapid loss of media life in common-brand SSD
Rapid loss of media life in common-brand SSD

Get a Mac Pro Workhorse, Cheap

Half the price of a bare bones 2013 Mac Pro, the 2009 Mac Pro remains a solid workhorse.

Upgrade the CPU or add up to four internal hard drives in the drives bays or add up to three PCIe cards.

2.93 GHz Mac Pro for $1499

6-core 3.33 GHz Mac Pro from $1159 <==== 6 cores at 3.33 GHz

Other used Macs

Mac Pro workhorse system
Mac Pro workhorse system

OWC Offers Thunderbay Mini, Thunderbolt v2 Enclosure for 2.5-Inch SSDs or Hard Drives (4 bays)

The OWC Thunderbay 4 has become MPG’s all time favorite external storage.

OWC is now offering the Thunderbay Mini, a 4-bay enclosure for 2.5-inch drives (SSDs or hard drives). The smaller unit is attractive for portability and/or for installing solid state drives (SSDs) in a compact form factor. MPG will have SSD and HDD units for testing soon.

For example, a 4TB OWC Thunderbay Mini, using 4 X 1TB SSDs. While there are Thunderbolt 2 external SSDs that can max-out the bus, the 4TB capacity with a RAID-5 option (3TB usable capacity in RAID 5) adds fault tolerance to speed, a big plus for those who want to minimize the risks of any drive failure for critical work. But if needs change, one can switch at will, since the RAID is software RAID-5.

Or it can be run for maximum speed and capacity as RAID-0 stripe (4TB capacity) or a mirrored solution, or individual drives/volumes—see SoftRAID 5.

The Thunderbay Mini can also be outfitted with 2.5-inch hard drives, which allows up to an 8TB Thunderbay Mini (6TB as a RAID-5 solution).

MPG recommends the RAID-5 edition, because it includes SoftRAID 5, and one can then pick and choose whatever RAID or non-RAID one wishes.

OWC Thunderbay Mini — 4-bay enclosure with Thunderbolt 2 for SSD or HDD
OWC Thunderbay Mini — 4-bay enclosure with Thunderbolt 2 for SSD or HDD

iPhone / iPad: New Security Risks Emerge

Everyone, and perhaps especially parents with kids having iOS devices:

U.S. Government Warns iOS Users About 'Masque Attack' Vulnerability

According to Reuters:

Such attacks could be avoided if iPad and iPhone users only installed apps from Apple's App Store or from their own organizations, it said.

Hopefully Apple will take action quickly on this one and Wire Lurker.

Personally, I’d like features in iOS and OS X that shut off big chunks of junk (to me) that I never use. More features = more security holes, an age-old story that only gets worse as operating systems become more complex.

OS X Yosemite Deletes VIP list in Apple Mail

I had curated a just-right VIP list in Apple Mail with about 30 entries.

OS X 10.10 Yosemite destroyed that list—it’s gone, wiped out. As I seem to recall, OS X 10.9 Mavericks did the same thing.

MPG doesn’t know if this is a common problem.

Gary Q writes:

I also lost my VIP list. Just. Wonderful. I am also finding Mail to be hanging a lot and having to force-quit it very often. Never had issues like this before.

MPG: I suspect a general bug. I use the feature as designed; it ought to work across upgrades. I also have been seeing more Mail hangs that require force-quit.

Arne D writes :

This also happened to me, my VIP list disappeared. However, the 'stars' were still next to the names of mails from VIPs in the mail list. I Selected one of those mails and clicked the star twice (first un-VIP then VIP again). After this it showed the VIP list again, with the original VIPs still there.

MPG: MPG uses “classic layout” and no stars are visible in the mail list. Switching that layout style off, the stars show, but only for the new 2 or 3 now re-added / re-done. So the old list is apparently toast.


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